pyramid

Learning pytest using continuous integration with Azure Pipelines (or SSH key hell) - Part 1

Introduction I’m still on my quest to learn more Python and at the top of that list is learning pytest. I just can’t wrap my head around testing and I know my two Pyramid apps aren’t “complete” until there are tests. (I did write docs, so I have that going for me). A couple months ago I (very easily) added continuous integration to NFLPool using Microsoft’s Azure Pipelines. I, like many other people, have been blown away by the right turn Microsoft made a few years back to embrace open source, and wanted to give Azure Pipelines a try.

It was a good week of Python and me

It was a good week for Python and me. In no particular order: MLBPool2 I pushed a major re-write of MLBPool2 to production just days before the baseball season ended. Why didn’t I wait until the baseball season was over before pushing a major update? Because MySportsFeeds this summer upgraded their API from 1.x to 2.0 and it included a big change to how they track team standings, especially playoff standings.

NFLPool - The Work Continues

For once in my life, I’m not procrastinating. With the NFL season just over four and a half months away, I’ve already started on working to update NFLPool. I’m really enjoying working with Python and don’t want to let the few things I’ve learned get rusty. This includes back porting a number of updates from MLBPool2. I’ve updated the Standings page to display all seasons played (before it defaulted to just the current season).

MLBPool2

A fantasy baseball like application written in Python and built with Pyramid to track and report MLB season pool picks and points for league play.

NFLPool

A fantasy football like application written in Python and built with Pyramid to track and report NFL season pool picks and points for league play.

MLBPool2 – Letting a Player Change their Picks

I’ve been blogging a little bit about MLBPool2 the last couple of weeks and now the last three months of work is complete. I already touched on two of the biggest differences between NFLPool and MLBPool2 (the time service using Pendulum and using MySQL / MariaDB instead of SQLite). The biggest difference between NFLPool and MLBPool2 though is players have the ability to change their picks. At the All-Star Break, MLBPool2 players can change up to 14 of their 37 picks, but those changes are only worth half points.

MLBPool2 is live!

I deployed MLBPool2 on Monday. I had a flurry of activity over the weekend to fix a scoring bug. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t get MLBPool2 to match the 2017 results that were done by hand. I learned that I don’t have the patience to hand enter the picks for 16 players and then all of their All-Star Break changes. I did it three times and every time I would catch a mistake that I made.

Introducing MLBPool2

After learning Python and creating NFLPool, it was time for another project. This time it was building the site for MLBPool2, which inspired NFLPool. MLBPool was the brain child of former commissioner Jason Theros who created the league and rules. Sadly, MLBPool came to an end after the 2011 season. The original site was written in ASP and none of the code was available and for the last few years after my friend resurrected the league he did almost everything by hand.

NFLPool: a (kind of) Post Mortem

I’m now four weeks into NFLPool being live. The week leading up to and after the launch of NFLPool for NFL week 1 was kind of a blur. I wish I had taken better notes or wrote down everything that happened, but now being a month into it, here are some random thoughts. Submitting Picks Somewhere in my code, I screwed up the function to disallow making picks. The code should have refused to let a user make picks after 7pm CST on the Thursday kickoff of the first game, about twenty minutes before the game starts.

Importing NFL statistics into NFLPool

NFLPool has been live for almost two weeks – and hasn’t crashed (yet!) After the rush to get the site up and allow a user to make their picks before I left on vacation, there is one more large chunk of work to get to 1.0 release: calculate the score for all players every week of the NFL season. I spent all of last week in the middle of Minnesota at a friend’s cabin.