mlbpool2

It was a good week of Python and me

It was a good week for Python and me. In no particular order: MLBPool2 I pushed a major re-write of MLBPool2 to production just days before the baseball season ended. Why didn’t I wait until the baseball season was over before pushing a major update? Because MySportsFeeds this summer upgraded their API from 1.x to 2.0 and it included a big change to how they track team standings, especially playoff standings.

Password Validation in NFLPool and MLBPool2

When I first learned to work with Pyramid thanks to the Talk Python course Python for Entrepreneurs, I used the account registration system directly from the course for NFLPool. When I wrote MLBPool2, I augmented it to require the user to use a much stronger password than the course taught. (You can see the original code from NFLPool here). In MLBPool2, I required the user to use a password between 8 and 24 characters and it must have at least one lowercase letter, at least one upper case letter, a number, and a symbol:

Where I get stats for MLBPool and NFLPool: MySportsFeeds (and it’s awesome)

A few years ago I started to look into how I could build apps to manage MLBPool and NFLPool. The key would be how to integrate all of the team and player statistics and where to get that data. I was floored when I saw the pricing of how much companies charge to provide those stats – it was hundreds to thousands of dollars per month to get access to baseball or football stats.

MLBPool2 & MySQL / MariaDB

When I wrote yesterday introducing MLBPool2, I buried the lede. One of the biggest changes between NFLPool and MLBPool2 is the fact I’m now using MariaDB and MySQL as the backend instead of SQLite, which NFLPool uses. (I did look at PostgreSQL since so many Python developers seem to prefer it, but I’ve never been able to get a PostgreSQL server up and running on Linux or Mac. My sysadmin skills are nonexistent.